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Hunting

Hunting

This feature now available on our Backroad GPS Maps!

By popular demand, Backroad Mapbooks is proud to introduce a new Hunting section in the latest mapbooks. Sure we have always shown the Wildlife Management Units or Zones on the maps, but people always want to learn more. Now if you are interested in hunting black bear in Ontario, whitetail deer hunting in Alberta, elk hunting in BC or duck hunting in the Maritimes you will know where to go.

Not only do we point out the best areas to hunt for your preferred big game or game bird species, but we also offer detailed maps to show where you can get to. From remote backroads or logging road to swamp areas and low lands there is no shortage of information on the maps. Even better we also show relief topography so you can really see the lay of the land. Hunters will also be interested in our Backroad TOPO series and the Digital Edition maps. The later can be overlaid onto Google Earth to do a fly through of your hunting area before heading out. How cool is that?

What to look for

Line Style/Symbol on the maps
Map

Look for the management units on our maps.

Symbol in the writing
writeup

Look for the hunting symbol in our refernece to see where you can hunt.

Write-up in Reference
writeup

Look for the Hunting section in our books to find the most popular hunting spots.

Newsletter's Featured Trips   For more Featured Trails check out our Blog.

Vancouver Coast & Mountains BC: MU 2-17 (Map 26, 27)
This management unit is more interior than coast and encompasses the Coquihalla drainage. The area has a lot of deer (mule deer), but heavy snowpack can have a negative impact on populations. There are also lots of black bear, and some good cougar hunting, but the limited number of backroads in this area can make access difficult. The drier interior climate offers better conditions for grouse, too.

Central Alberta: Deer – White-Tail Deer
There are two species of deer found in Alberta, mule deer and white-tail deer. Of the two, white-tails are the most common. In fact, they are Alberta’s most abundant cloven-hoofed animals. They are named after their notable white tail. When the deer run, their tails are held erect, exposing the white underside, hence the name "white-tail." White-tails have no rump patch and are usually a grayish brown in winter and a reddish brown in summer. They are smaller than mule deer, with white-tailed bucks averaging 90 kg (200 lb.), while does average about 60 kg (130 lb.). Their antlers have un-branched tines extending up from single beams.
White-tails possess excellent senses of sight, smell and hearing and bound away gracefully when frightened. They are found in along the transition areas of forests or in open brush feeding on buds, twigs, saplings and evergreen needles in the winter, and on grass, fruit and leaves in the summer. They are frequently found in wooded river flats or in aspen groves. Their range is expanding westward into the foothills and they are becoming more common in the boreal forests of the north, too where they browse on forbs, chokecherry, Saskatoon, and other shrubs. In addition to food, brushy patches also provide good cover.
The provincial population of white-tail deer is estimated to be about 232,000. The best hunting times are usually in the early morning and late evening, but deer can be bagged at any time of the day, especially around the November rut. Depending on location, hunting seasons can start as early as August and end as late as November.
Places to try: WMUs 204, 230, 250, 505

Eastern Ontario: White-tail Deer
White-tail deer are one of the most common large mammals in Ontario, with a population of over half a million deer across the province. They get their name from the notable white rump and tail. When the deer run, their tails are held erect, exposing the white underside. They are usually a grayish brown in winter and a reddish brown in summer. White-tailed bucks averaging 90 kg (200 lb.), while does average about 60 kg (130 lb.). Their antlers have un-branched tines extending up from single beams.
White-tail possess excellent senses of sight, smell and hearing and bound away gracefully when frightened. They are found in along the transition areas of forests or in open brush. They feed on buds, twigs, saplings and evergreen needles in the winter and on grass, fruit and leaves in the summer. They are frequently found in wooded river flats or in aspen groves. Their range is expanding westward into the foothills and they are becoming more common in the boreal forests of the north, too. They browse on forbs, chokecherry, Saskatoon and other shrubs. In addition to food, brushy patches also provide good cover.
White-tailed deer are found scattered throughout Eastern Ontario, with good to excellent populations across this entire region. The best populations are found in the Kemptville area, where some of the best hunting in the province is found. The best hunting times are usually in the early morning and late evening, but deer can be bagged at any time of the day.
Best places to try: WMU Zones 60, 63A, 63B, 64A, 64B, 69B

Tips

In order to improve your chances of spotting game birds and animals, wear natural colours and unscented clothing. Be sure to stay downwind and keep your movements to a minimum.

Partners, Government, Clubs and Associations


alberta fish and gamesBC Wildlife FederationGrouse River Outfittersontario federation of anglers and hunters
Unit 106-1500 Hartley Ave, Coquitlam, BC, V3K 7A1
P: 604-521-6277
Toll Free: 1-877-520-5670
info@backroadmapbooks.com
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